Review: Spike Brew Kettle V3

by Brett Shegogue | Last Updated: January 23, 2016

Watch the video above for my review of the Spike V3 10-Gallon Brew Kettle. The Spike Brewing kettles also come in 15, 20, 30 and even 50 gallon increments! Spike offers kettles with one or two sanitary welded couplers which are custom fabricated in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Typically brewing 5 or 3- gallon batches, I opted to go with the 10-gallon kettle as it best meets my brewing needs.

As discussed in the video I will also reiterate some of the kettle’s features:

  • Sanitary TIG welds
  • Heavy Duty 304 stainless steel with 1.2 mm thick walls
  • Tri Clad bottom (induction compatible)
  • 1.2:1 Height to Width ratio
  • Coupler Options (Horizontal or Vertical)
  • Silicon handles – no burning your hands
  • Accurate Internal etched volume markings at every ½ gallon
  • Tapered bottom to accommodate false bottom for mashing
  • Proprietary Push-to-Connect ⅝”stainless steel dip tube

Overall, this is a very high quality brew kettle.

Spike’s catch phrase is, “Your liver will fail before their equipment does,” and I agree. The only negative I could identify is that using the standard center dip tube and an immersion chiller makes it very difficult to chill your wort when brewing small batches of beer.

This is caused by the limited wort volume above the dip tube which leaves little wort in contact with the immersion chiller. If this is an issue you think you may have, I would recommend getting the folks at Spike to make you a custom dip tube that would stay closer to the edge of the kettle.

spikebrewkettle2

Spike Kettle Volume Markings

Spike Dip Tube

Spike Dip Tube 2

Spike Dip Tube 3

Spike Dip Tube 4

Spike Kettle 2

Spike Kettle 4

If you are looking for a high quality welded kettle consider purchasing one from Spike Brewing!

Disclaimer: The kettle featured below was provided compliments of Spike Brewing.

Brett is a passionate and award-winning homebrewer as well as a Certified BJCP Judge. He loves to talk about beer and DIY projects. You can find him sharing his knowledge through his personal blog and online internet forums. He lives in a Maryland suburb outside of Washington, D.C.